Orange-apedia

GENERAL

Orange

Orange Conference

Family Ministry

 

ORANGE

ORANGE IS A STRATEGY. FOR COMBINING CRITICAL INFLUENCES IN LIFE TO FUEL FAITH IN THE NEXT GENERATION.

Orange is a path, a strategy that combines the strength of two—yellow and red—to create the brilliance of another, Orange. By combining the critical influences of the light of the church and the love of the family, the Orange strategy synchronizes efforts and shows a generation who God is, more effectively than either could alone.

ORANGE IS A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN. IMAGINE EVERY LEADER AND EVERY PARENT IN YOUR CHURCH WITH EXACTLY THE SAME STRATEGY IN MIND FOR REACHING THE END GOAL.

From preschool to college, it draws on the elements of wonder, discovery and passion, infusing them into children, students and young adults. Why? To see God for who He is, to help young people see themselves the way God sees them, so that they can love others the way God does.

Starting with wonder, Orange helps preschoolers embrace a God who is bigger than their imagination, then adds discovery so children can understand how to grow in their relationship with God. Finally, Orange fuels passion by giving students opportunities to be the church and to make a difference influencing their generation.

ORANGE IS A UNIQUE APPROACH TO CURRICULUM. THE ORANGE CURRICULUM IS ALWAYS RELEVANT, BIBLICAL, ENGAGING AND EXPERIENTIAL, BUT THERE ARE ALSO SIX ADDITIONAL DISTINCTIVES OF ALL OUR RESOURCES.

PERPETUALLY INNOVATIVE Orange curriculum is known for innovation and creativity. Our writers, editors, video producers and creative directors are always thinking of new ways to say, show and teach timeless truths. Everything is being rewritten and repackaged continually.

PARENT LINKED Every Orange curriculum has unique “parent cues” that connect and engage them in the overall strategy. Look for the “cue” in each curriculum to partner with parents and combine your influence with theirs.

LEADER NETWORKED Each church is assigned one or more Orange Specialist to personally assist you in implementing the curriculum and strategy. They’ll also help you connect to a community of other leaders who are passionate about the same things you are.

UNIQUELY CUSTOMIZABLE It’s a trademark of our curriculum: bend it; shape it; make it your own. Because it’s web based, the material can be edited to fit your environment.

STRATEGICALLY SYNCHRONIZED Orange is the only curriculum that offers a consistent, unifying strategic plan from preschool through college. Part of the overall strategy is to synchronize the efforts of all leaders and establish consistency in the lives of kids and teenagers from preschool through college.

RELATIONALLY DRIVEN Our strategy emphasizes small groups, making it easy to connect kids to mentors and leaders who can personally invest in them.

ORANGE IS A COMMUNITY. WHEN YOU’RE ORANGE, YOU’RE NOT ALONE.

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Orange Conference

Orange is impacting thousands of churches around the world. It’s a strategy that’s focused on helping churches and families combine influences, and work together to fuel faith in the next generation.The Orange Conference is where your entire team can discover and dive deep into that strategy. It’s about real solutions, not just pie-in-the-sky possibilities. It involves every leader—preschool and children’s leaders along with student leaders and senior leadership—so that you can create team unity around a shared vision. It’s about being inspired and instructed by gifted communicators who have a burning passion for the faith of the next generation.Ultimately, it’s about a community of church leaders who have found something that works. And they’re so passionate about it that they want to connect, have fun together, share ideas, tell stories and help each other.

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Conference Web Site: http://www.theorangeconference.com

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FAMILY MINISTRY

Family Ministry is an effort to synchronize church leaders and parents around a master plan to build faith and character in their sons and daughters.

EXAMPLE
  • Family ministry should not be another program you add to your list of programs.
  • It should be the filter you use to create and evaluate what you do to influence children and teenagers.
  • There is a difference between doing something for the family and doing something with the family.
  • The primary principles that we have established as the basis for our approach to family ministry are:
    • Nothing is more important than someone’s relationship with God.
    • No one has more potential to influence a child’s relationship with God than a parent.
    • No one has more potential to influence the parent than the church.
    • The church’s potential to influence a child dramatically increases when it partners with a parent.
    • The parent’s potential to influence a child dramatically increases when that parent partners with the church.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=61

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PRESCHOOL

Policies and Procedures

VBS and Summer Curriculum

Volunteer Roles

Production

Portable Church

Partnering with Parents

Worship

Family Experience

Curriculum

Baby Dedication

 

Policies and Procedures

Establish guidelines for ministry staff and volunteers to follow for the purpose of protecting children (and volunteers) in a preschool ministry environment, including background screening and adequate training of volunteers to ensure the safety of preschoolers.

Family ministry encourages close, significant relationships between children and trusted adult leaders. Appropriate background screening of preschool volunteers is highly recommended, so churches can be certain that the adults placed in relationship with their children can be trusted.

EXAMPLE
  • Set specific criteria for volunteering in your preschool ministry. I.e., set age limits for working in the nursery, such as only 18 years or older. Parents are more comfortable leaving their infant in the hands of an adult than they would a 12-year-old student.
  • At the very least, run a national criminal background check. You may also request SSN verifications or check driving records.
  • Request volunteer applications to be completed. Include questions about past experience with children, ministry, teaching, etc.
  • Request multiple character references.
  • Once your organization has created policies and procedures, train your volunteers.
  • Meet with local law enforcement to learn about reporting laws. Gain ideas from the professionals on how to respond to medical emergencies and crisis situations.
  • Create a security team to monitor the hallways of your preschool ministry.
  • Establish policies that protect the integrity of your volunteers.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Secure Search: http://www.securesearchpro.com

LexisNexis Volunteer: https://volunteer.lexisnexis.com

National Sex Offender Registry: http://www.nsopw.gov

Christian Security Network: http://www.christiansecuritynetwork.org

ChurchSafety.com: http://www.churchsafety.com

SafeKids Inc http://www.churchnursery.com

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VBS and Summer Curriculum

Summer can be a great time to intentionally shift what we do and how we do it! Typically during the summer months, churches have fluctuations in regular attendance. Summer then, is a great time to mix up presentation style and programming, while giving volunteer staff a well-deserved chance to refresh. Summer can also be a great opportunity for leveraging kids’ free time to build stronger relationships with each other, small group leaders and with God. For preschoolers, this can be a one week-long event, or a specific routine set in place for the course of the summer months.

EXAMPLE
  • Choose materials that are created with a preschooler in mind.
  • Can’t buy summer materials? Adapt your usual curriculum for a special summer experience. Simplify your routine by choosing activities that require minimal or no supplies. Extend worship by singing more songs. Choose games/activities you could do outside to create an outdoor experience.
  • Give volunteers a break by using video storytelling/teaching or worship DVDs.
  • Create a special theme for the summer (i.e., Superheroes from First Look, October 2010).
  • Use the summer as an opportunity to try a new curriculum before launching anything big in the fall.
  • Encourage parents to participate as volunteers, giving them an opportunity to experience it with their preschoolers.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Chase The Light – Curriculum in a Box (with Shine The Light component for preschoolers) https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=767

Wonder! Look at God’s Story (Bible stories on DVD) https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=865&cat=83&page=1

Little Praise Party https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=532

First Look Curriculum Bundle https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=640

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Volunteer Roles

Volunteers are vital and key to the success of any ministry. Defining and then creating specific roles for each volunteer can maximize your impact within your ministry. Give each volunteer a significant role, rather than a task to complete.

EXAMPLE

Define the roles you need/want to fill within your ministry. Look for an individual’s strengths, personality type, leadership abilities and spiritual gifts to determine what role he/she may fill.

Volunteer positions may look different for each church, but here are some examples of preschool ministry roles:

  • Storyteller– communicates the weekly Bible story in an engaging, creative way
  • Host– begins large group experience/Bible story time by introducing the topic, engaging the preschoolers to gain their attention and focus; leads into the Bible story
  • Worship Leader– leads children in a worship experience through music
  • Small Group Leader– primary leader for the group/class, trusted adult, recommended that this is a consistent, familiar face preschoolers see week to week; facilitates activities, and develops relationships with the children.
  • Assistant– assists the small group leader with facilitating activities; helps with discipline/calming children; helps keep children engaged and participating
  • Supply/Curriculum Team– gathers weekly supplies; makes copies for group activities (e.g., stay-at-home moms with children in full-time school, or elderly individuals who want to support children’s ministry but cannot volunteer in a classroom due to physical/health limitations)
  • Team Leader/Coordinator– may lead a team of volunteers; supports the small group leaders/teachers; communicates weekly with group leaders; offers encouragement; provides assistance with transitioning children to/from rooms; monitors hallways; available to assist with emergency situations

Be creative with the names of your volunteer roles. Make them fun and exciting so that the roles will attract people, not deter them.

Clearly define what your expectations are of each volunteer.

Make sure volunteers understand the vision behind what they’re doing, so they know their specific role is significant to the overall ministry.

Provide continuous encouragement, and express your appreciation to demonstrate to your volunteers that you value them and what they do.

ADDITIONAL LINKS

“Volunteers that Stick” – J. Wideman: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=818

“Simply Strategic Volunteers” – T. Stevens, T. Morgan: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Strategic-Volunteers-Empowering-Ministry/dp/0764427563

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Production

Production is not just for the older kids. Taking time to produce a large group/small group experience is so important for preschoolers. There is nothing like seeing their eyes light up when they connect to the Bible story, when they know the answer to the question, or when they worship with their whole body!

EXAMPLE
  • Preschool production is the creation of the large group environment for a preschool ministry.
  • The best large groups set up good discussion and application in the subsequent small group time.
  • The major elements that preschool production teams create are an emcee who introduces the Bible story and a real life situation that the Bible story will deal with.
  • The Bible story is then told in a creative, engaging way. The story can be told by the emcee, another storyteller, or through video.
  • There is worship time that can be led, again by the emcee or another worship leader.
  • Preschool-appropriate songs are used that reinforce the bottom line and basic truth for the week.
  • A preschool production team also will need someone to begin any video presentations and the music for worship time.
  • Sets for this production can be very simple or more elaborate depending on facilities and resources.
  • Consistency will be key for preschoolers.
  • The order of production should not change too much because the consistency encourages their participation, especially as they become more familiar with the environment.
  • Small group leaders should sit with their small groups and lead them in worship by their participation.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

First Look Curriculum for Preschool: http://www.whatisorange.org/firstlook

“Wonder! Look in God’s Story” DVDs: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/home.php?cat=84

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Portable Church

Church plants and multisite churches often choose to meet in spaces that involve portable equipment. This provides unique opportunities in how ministries create irresistible environments for their preschoolers both in what they create and where they meet. It also involves the logistics of setting up and tearing down quickly.

EXAMPLE
  • Portable church requires clean and safe environments for preschool-aged children, which are set up and torn down on a weekly basis in spaces not used by the church as a regular 24/7 facility.
  • Theaters, schools and other public buildings are often used in this capacity on weekends and during times when the building would typically be unoccupied.
  • Public facilities are often in favor of such arrangements because it provides additional revenue for them.
  • Portable church can be an advantage for churches because it helps reduce expensive overhead costs that come with owning a facility.
  • A safe preschool environment often consists of walls or dividers that are erected to define or contain spaces.
  • Soft and safe flooring or carpets are easily taken apart or rolled to store. Folding tables, staking chairs and toys are also unpacked from cases and bins.
  • Successful preschool portable churches have environments that provide peace of mind for parents as they leave their child in your care.
  • A committed core of volunteers is imperative to make portable church a success. Proper equipment helps speed both the set up and tear down processes. A well-equipped preschool environment can often be set up in less than 45 minutes and torn down in less than that with one or two volunteers.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Portable Church Industries: http://www.portablechurch.com

Portable Church Case Study in an Orange Church: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLFZIkyxBPM&feature=related

Great Stores for Great Stuff: http://www.ikea.com http://www.alectrosystems.com

Flooring: http://www.softnsafefloors.com/specials1.htm

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Partnering with Parents

Parents have more potential than anyone to influence the spiritual development of their preschooler. We want to equip parents during the early years of their child’s life by creating a rhythm at home and setting a pace for shaping their child’s faith. We also have the opportunity to connect with parents of preschoolers in ways that give them the tools for engaging the curious hearts of their preschoolers at home.

EXAMPLE
  • Send take-home resources each week/month that cue parents into what you’re teaching at church, while also providing ideas for continuing the conversation at home (i.e., Parent Cues – First Look Parent/Small Talk resources).
  • Start early! Connect with expectant parents to encourage them to think about their child’s spiritual development even before their child is born (i.e., Baby Dedication Celebration).
  • Create an event just for parents of preschoolers. Provide an experience for parents to learn hands-on ideas for creating a rhythm each week that build’s their child’s relationship with their heavenly Father (i.e., Create A Rhythm Event).
  • Create an experience for the family. Provide periodic events that are just for mom, dad and their preschooler to have a shared experience (i.e., once a month or quarterly gathering for parents to experience the Bible stories, music and activities along with their preschoolers, such as a “Mother’s Morning In”).
  • Music! Preschoolers love to sing and dance. Music is an excellent approach for integrating the truths that are taught at church into the home. Encourage parents to engage their preschooler at home through the worship music you’ve incorporated into your weekly preschool environments (i.e., One Big Gulp).
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Baby Dedication Celebration: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=775

Preschool Parenting: Create A Rhythm Event: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=621

Parenting Beyond Your Capacity – R. Joiner, C. Nieuwhof: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=779&cat=0&page=1

One Big Gulp – Worship Music for Preschoolers: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=755&cat=0&page=1

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Worship

If you have ever seen a preschooler worship, then you know it requires their whole body!

EXAMPLE
  • Preschool worship can happen primarily in the large group setting. It is corporate worship through age-appropriate music.
  • An adult leader can lead the time through singing and motions.
  • At least one song can also reinforce the basic truth and bottom line for the day. Other songs can be added, depending on the amount of time available for large group and the ability of a group of preschoolers to stay engaged.
  • Motions to songs are always helpful for preschoolers to learn the words, which encourages their engagement in the worship time.
  • This time is an opportunity for preschoolers to begin learning how to worship to music in a corporate setting with their peers and leaders.
  • Leader participation is crucial for preschoolers in the learning process.
  • Preschoolers will look to their leaders during worship time to learn how to participate appropriately and meaningfully.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Preschool Music Resources: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/home.php?cat=85

Amber Sky Records: http://www.amberskyrecords.com

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Family Experience

We have identified three times each year when we offer parents some additional ideas that they can do at home with their preschoolers. All of these ideas connect to what they are learning at church, and give parents tools to create some special teaching moments at home.

EXAMPLE
  • Send home a boxed cake mix with each family the Sunday before Christmas. (You may also include a can of packaged icing and a box of birthday candles.) Include an instructions card with the memory verse and bottom line for the month. Tell families to bake the cakes with their preschoolers, decorate them, light the candles, and sing “Happy Birthday, Jesus!” This is a fun family tradition to start at this age. Be sure to take a photograph each year!
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://www.whatisorange/myfirstlook.org

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Curriculum

First Look is a web-based curriculum that uses engaging activities to introduce preschool children (ages one to five) to God. First Look gives children a first impression of their heavenly Father and the wonder of His love for each one of them.

EXAMPLE

By the time a child is five years old, we want them to know:

God made me. Psalm 139:13-14: “For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well.”

God loves me. Romans 8:38-39: “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

Jesus wants to be my friend forever. John 3:16: “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://whatisorange.org/firstlook/

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Baby Dedication

More than just an event, Baby Dedication is the beginning of a partnership between parents and the church. It is an opportunity for parents to commit to partnering with the church to raise their child and take the primary responsibility to invest in the spiritual development of their child.

EXAMPLE
  • Offer a resource to guide parents through a three-step process to prepare the hearts of the parents for their baby’s dedication.
  • Introduce parents to the concepts of “Imagine the End,” and “Make It Personal.”
  • Wrap up your dedication event with a celebration for the newest member of each family in attendance.
  • Provide a follow up resource to begin the ongoing partnership between the church and the parents.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=775 http://www.orangeparents.org/

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CHILDREN

CUE Box Promo

Volunteer Roles

Policies and Procedures and Systems

Portable Church

Production

Service

Small Groups

VBS and Summer Curriculum

Plan of Salvation

New to Orange

Worship

Family Experience

 

CUE Box Promo

CUE Box is a great resource for kids and parents to interact with the monthly virtue.  So much so, that you want to make sure and let every family know about it at your church.  Have you ever wondered how to promote CUE Box in a creative way?

EXAMPLE

Dan Scott and Jonathan Cliff have come up with the idea of showing their churches a video of them with their kids explaining what the CUE Box is all about.  Through videos such as these, parents will understand each piece.  And as a result parents will have the tools they need to connect with their kids during the week and continue the conversation that you start in your weekly environments.

The Anatomy of a CUE Box with Dan and Liam

November Cue Box

For more information on CUE Box go to www.studio252.com.

Check out the Orange Store to purchase CUE Box!

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Volunteer Roles

Volunteers are vital and key to the success of any ministry. Defining and then creating specific roles for each volunteer can maximize your impact within your ministry. Give each volunteer a significant role, rather than a task to complete.

EXAMPLE

Define the roles you need/want to fill within your ministry. Look for an individual’s strengths, personality type, leadership abilities and spiritual gifts to determine what role he/she may fill.

Volunteer positions may look different for each church, but here are some examples of preschool ministry roles:

  • Storyteller – communicates the weekly Bible story in an engaging, creative way
  • Host – begins large group experience/Bible story time by introducing the topic, engaging the preschoolers to gain their attention and focus; leads into the Bible story.
  • Worship Leader – leads children in a worship experience through music
  • Small Group Leader – primary leader for the group/class; trusted adult; recommended that this is a consistent, familiar face preschoolers see week to week; facilitates activities; develops relationships with the children.(For your leaders who love to connect with children and lead them in fun, engaging activities, which teach them about their heavenly Father and about relationship with Jesus Christ, our curriculum encourages using a consistent small group leader with every eight to 10 children.)
  • Assistant – assists the small group leader with facilitating activities; helps with discipline/calming children; helps keep children engaged and participating
  • Supply/Curriculum Team – gathers weekly supplies; makes copies for group activities (e.g., stay-at-home moms with children in full-time school, or elderly individuals who want to support children’s ministry but cannot volunteer in a classroom due to physical/health limitations)
  • Team Leader/Coordinator – may lead a team of volunteers; supports the small group leaders/teachers; communicates weekly with group leaders; offers encouragement; provides assistance with transitioning children to/from rooms; monitors hallways; available to assist with emergency situations
  • Classroom Facilitator – for volunteers who enjoy organizing and connecting with groups of adults, you can choose to use a classroom facilitator to oversee small group leaders and your children’s learning environment.
  • Greeters – If parents are checking children into their ministry environment, you can use a volunteer to greet families and walk them through the check in and security procedures. This volunteer can also collect rolls and record the totals for each classroom.
  • Tech People – Our large group time provides volunteer opportunities for people who enjoy providing audio, video and computer graphic support, if your resources allow.

Be creative with the names of your volunteer roles. Make them fun and exciting so that the roles will attract people, not deter them.

Clearly define what your expectations are of each volunteer.

Make sure volunteers understand the vision behind what they’re doing, so they know their specific role is significant to the overall ministry.

Provide continuous encouragement, and express your appreciation to demonstrate to your volunteers that you value them and what they do.

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Volunteers that Stick – J. Wideman: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=818

Simply Strategic Volunteers – T. Stevens, T. Morgan: http://www.amazon.com/Simply-Strategic-Volunteers-Empowering-Ministry/dp/0764427563

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Policies and Procedures and Systems

Systems are tasks that are routinely carried out and need to be completed with excellence to keep processes functioning smoothly and efficiently. These are tasks that, when done well, create an enjoyable and attractive environment. But when executed poorly or ignored, these tasks cause frustration, conflict and repel visitors, regular attendees and volunteers. Systems should be refined until they are most efficient and effective.

EXAMPLE
  • Communicating: How will you inform senior leadership, staff, the general congregation, first-time visitors, parents, volunteers and kids what they need to know? How will you cast vision continuously, creatively and compellingly?
  • Environment: How will you/your team prepare and maintain a comfortable, appealing space for each group? What resources do you regularly need to purchase and ensure their timely delivery? What security measures will you put into place and how will you maintain them? How will you prepare and distribute materials for each environment? How will you help visitors feel welcome and regular attendees feel they belong?
  • Leadership Development: How will you develop new leadership in staff and volunteers? What resources and events will you use? (Plan to use materials found at www.YouLeadOrange.comand attending The Orange Conference each year.)
  • Team-building: How will you invite, screen, place, orient, and provide on-going training and community for staff and volunteers? How will you develop roles and a team organizational structure for large group, small group, administration and resource preparation?

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Portable Church

Church plants and multisite churches often choose to meet in spaces that involve portable equipment. This provides unique opportunities in how ministries create irresistible environments for their children both in what they create and where they meet. It also involves the logistics of setting up and tearing down quickly.

EXAMPLE
  • Portable church requires clean and safe environments for preschool-aged children, which are set up and torn down on a weekly basis in spaces not used by the church as a regular 24/7 facility.
  • Theaters, schools, and other public buildings are often used in this capacity on weekends and during times when the building would typically be unoccupied.
  • Public facilities are often in favor of such arrangements because it provides additional revenue for them.
  • Portable church can be an advantage for churches because it helps reduce expensive overhead costs that come with owning a facility.
  • Portable children’s environments often consist of walls or dividers that are erected to define spaces.
  • Flooring or carpets that are easily taken apart or rolled to pack up are often used.
  • Games and supplies are also packed up and stored when not in use throughout the week.
  • Media Pop-Ups or banners are often used to help create a theme in the environment.
  • Portable lighting, projectors, and sound systems are often used in portable children’s environments.
  • A committed core of volunteers is imperative to make portable church a success. Proper equipment helps speed both the set up and tear down processes. A well-equipped children’s environment can often be set up and torn down in less than 30 minutes with one or two volunteers.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Portable Church Industries: http://www.portablechurch.com

Portable Church Case Study on an Orange Church: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLFZIkyxBPM&feature=related

Stuff: http://www.ikea.com http://www.alectrosystems.com

Flooring: http://www.softnsafefloors.com/specials1.htm

Walls: http://www.baplaysets.com/shopping/itemdetailcf.asp?itemID=CF900-520

Dividers: http://www.portablepartitions.com/

Media Pop Up Banners: http://www.nimlok.ca/solutions/portables/pop-up-exhibits.aspx

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Production

Everything works better with a plan and structure. There is freedom in preparation. Kids can tell the difference between something that’s been thrown together last minute (possibly the morning of!) and something that has had planning and preparation. To give your kids the best experience, you’ll need to invest some time in planning. What does the month or series look like? What’s going to happen each week in that series?

EXAMPLE

Here are a few ways to create excellent programming for children!

  • It’s important to keep things fresh. Don’t do everything the same way every week. If you get bored, rest assured your kids are bored and able to predict what’s coming next. Change the order of things. Rotate segments. Change how many songs you do from week to week.
  • Develop a creative team to help in this area. This could be a team of volunteers that meets together to think through the services, and who come up with fun ways to enhance your environment, implement a special segment or illustration, perform a special song, etc. You could meet with these people weekly if time allows, or meet for lunch or breakfast a couple of times a month to throw out ideas—dreaming of how to teach kids in a fun and relevant way that they’ll be able to understand. The more this team works together, the more refined and effective these times will become.
  • Once you develop and create the plan, communicate it to your volunteers. Make sure they are aware of what’s planned and what you need them to do, so when they arrive on Sunday morning they can execute the plan with excellence.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://www.amberskyrecords.com offers valuable resources for churches to help lead an effective worship program as part of an annual subscription purchase. These items include devotions to have with your team, planned worship sets and scripts for the worship leader of what to say, and dance moves instructional videos.

http://www.planningcenteronline.com is a great resource for churches for creating your service planning sheets online. You can upload various media your team might need for rehearsal, send out invitations for participants who are a part of the service, and manage all this info online.

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Service

Kids won’t feel significant until they are given something significant to do! In our children’s curriculum, 252 Basics, children learn about how God has gifted them with specific talents and abilities, and that He has a specific purpose for their lives. This, coupled with the fact that they have the opportunity to see people serving in a variety of volunteer roles (see “volunteer roles”) in their 252 Basics environment, sets up children to understand THEY can serve in a way God has gifted them in their local church body.

EXAMPLE

Here are a few ways that kids can have the opportunity to serve!

  • Encourage their small groups to do something for the local community.
  • Have their small groups sponsor a child from Compassion International.
  • Give fourth and fifth graders the opportunity to learn how to run tech, be greeters, dance or sing!
  • Every November the 252 Basics curriculum provides opportunities for children to serve.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Compassion International: http://www.compassion.com

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Small Groups

Small groups provide intentional community for kids. One of the greatest gifts your church can provide families is a consistent community of caring adults who are there to be a second voice and give wise direction when life gets complicated. This community of adults and friends provides a place for children to belong while wrestling with life-changing truths, and as they apply them in everyday faith. Small groups go hand in hand with how God grows us spiritually.

EXAMPLE

Here are a few ways to have effective small groups:

  • Explain to adult volunteers the importance of building trust through being dependably present, prepared, and invested in the lives of kids, so that when life becomes emotional, kids turn to that second voice for direction.
  • Ask volunteers to commit to being a consistent leader.
  • Ask parents to commit to attending a specific service time so that kids can be placed in groups with a consistent leader and set of friends.
  • Assign “BFF’s” to visitors so that they are welcomed and feel a sense of belonging from the first minutes they arrive. These friends can be trained to engage them in conversation, help them to know what to do throughout the session, and introduce them to others.
  • Remember that relationships are the primary goal of small groups. Activities are designed to engage kids in spiritual discussion, and in the application of faith skills to connect them personally with their heavenly Father and each other.

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VBS and Summer Curriculum

Summer can be a great time to intentionally shift what we do and how we do it! Typically during the summer months, churches have fluctuations in regular attendance. Summer then, is a great time to mix up presentation style and programming, while giving volunteer staff a well-deserved chance to refresh. Summer can also be a great opportunity for leveraging kids’ free time to build stronger relationships with each other, small group leaders and with God.

EXAMPLE

Here are a few ideas to consider when planning for the summer:

  • If you are using 252 Basics, choose small group activities that’ll work for combined small groups (pull either same grades or K-3, 4-5, together for small group activities as attendance lowers), or use the 252 Basics K-5th version of activities.
  • Use the live lyrics or performance music videos for worship. All of these options would give your Host, Storytellers, vocalists, and many small group leaders time off from the schedule, while maintaining consistency in the content presented.
  • Consider saving planning time and resources, and focusing on building relationships, by traveling to Camp KidJam! Camp KidJam takes place around the country on various college campuses throughout the summer. Both leaders and children benefit from the camp experience as Orange staff and interns present Jam Sessions filled with Bible lessons and worship. These Jam Sessions are followed by small group time and activity tracks, including a leadership track for adults!
  • Chase The Light and Live It Out are our Camp KidJam curriculum bundles packaged into eight sessions for churches to use as a summer series, camp or VBS.
  • Summer is the perfect time to invite fresh faces to join the team since their commitment “trial” period would last only over the summer. Then, invite them to become a part of the team for the year when they’ve found their niche!
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Feature Presentation DVD http://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=875

Live It Out Performance DVD http://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=599

Camp KidJam http://www.campkidjam.com/

Chase The Light Curriculum http://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=767

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Plan of Salvation

Presenting God’s story of rescue and having a child accept Christ is the big win for children’s ministry. Imagine though, what it would mean to parents if they were invited, not only to be present for the most significant milestone of their child’s life, but to be set up as the spiritual hero and the one who leads their child in accepting Christ? What if we reactivated the family and created a unique environment for parents and kids to learn what it means to trust Jesus Christ and begin a personal relationship with Him together?

EXAMPLE

Here are some simple steps to take in order to provide an opportunity to equip moms and dads to join in the process of (and take the lead in) praying with their child to receive Christ.

  • Create an environment, scheduled as frequently as appropriate, where parents and kids would be brought together to hear the Gospel message. For Heaven’s Sake provides leaders with videos, live scripts, invitations, and follow-up materials to create an event like this.
    • Everyone attending would know the purpose and be ready to hear how to accept Christ and begin a relationship with Him.
    • Christian parents would be honored to be present at this momentous event in the life of their child.
    • Non-Christian parents would be respected and shown that the church believes in their ability to be a better parent. They’d be invited to hear the message of Salvation along with their child to lower any levels of intimidation.
  • Present the message using John 3:16 and focus on four memorable points.
  • Close by giving parents clear information on what they can do and say so they are able to talk and pray with their child and accept Christ.
  • Plan a baptism and celebration event since this moment is worth remembering!
ADDITIONAL LINKS

For Heaven’s Sake DVD https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=369

For Heaven’s Sake Family DVD https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=430

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New to Orange

The Orange Strategy is a strategy built on the principles that two influences (the church and the home) can have a greater impact when they work together. There are five principles of the Orange Strategy: Integrate Strategy, Refine the Message, Elevate Community, Reactivate the Family and Leverage Influence.

Being new to Orange means beginning to think differently. Instead of thinking about “me” and “my ministry,” it causes you think about what happens next, and for years to come. You will begin thinking in “steps, not programs.”

You will also begin to evaluate and think about how not to put on just a great program for children so they go away feeling good, it will cause you to be intentional about redistributing your efforts to reach the entire family. This way, what happens at home becomes more important than what happens at church.

EXAMPLE
  • The Integrate Strategy principle means that we teach with an end goal in mind, and that is to help children experience wonder, discovery and passion.
  • Refine the Message is implemented by moving children past information, and understanding what it means to apply what they’re learning to their everyday life. We want to help them build an everyday faith. Small group and large group activities reinforce each lesson.
  • Elevate Community is promoted within the Small Group Dialog, and through our belief that the small group leader is a vital element in the spiritual growth of students.
  • Reactivate the Family is advocated in the Parent Cue, a component designed to keep parents up to date with your current series. Also, Parent Cue provides “cues” to engage parents and children in conversation, as well as encourages parents to continue to fight for relationship with their child.
  • Leverage Influence is reflected in the consistent message of encouraging your students to become involved in serving, whether that’s in the local church, your community or helping others halfway around the world.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://whatisorange.org/ http://www.orangeleaders.com/

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Worship

We were all created to worship God. We don’t have to wait to become a Christian adult to be a worshipper. Just look at Psalm 8:1-2: “God, brilliant Lord, Yours is a household name. Nursing infants gurgle choruses about You; toddlers shout the songs that drown out enemy talk, and silence atheist babble,” (MSG). Kids naturally understand how to worship. After all, it is part of what God created them for.

EXAMPLE
  • The biggest thing to remember about kid’s worship is that they need the opportunity. Make sure you think of the music in your services and programs as more than just time filler or something to do that’s high energy.
  • Plan the songs you do with purpose.
  • Position the songs to create times of participation, but ultimately to give your kids the opportunity to praise their Creator.
  • Lead by example. There are always kids that will naturally jump on board and participate, but others need to be guided and led.
  • This is why the title “worship leader” is accurately labeled. Whether it’s one person or a team of 20, whoever is leading the songs needs to be the one that “leads worship.” They should be the ones that set the pace. Through everything they do—whether it’s their countenance, energy or words—they should engage the audience and point others to give praise to the King of kings.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://www.AmberSkyrRcords.com is a great resource to find relevant music for worship times for both elementary and preschool ages, and it’s all downloadable. Also, the site offers valuable resources for churches to help lead an effective worship program as part of an annual subscription purchase.

“The Big Story Dance Moves” DVD: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=251&cat=0&page=1

“The Worship Pulse” by Yancy Richmond: https://secure.rethinkgroup.org/store/product.php?productid=204

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Family Experience

Family Experience is a live event or service centered on a key monthly virtue, designed for parents and kids to experience together. Through engaging characters, creative drama, media and worship segment options, this experience is designed to be a fun, engaging event for elementary kids and parents! Churches are seen as a “partner” to the parents. Offering a Family Experience gives families an opportunity for dialogue, and provides action ideas for living out the monthly virtue at home. Family Experience is built upon the concept of: “What happens at home is more important than what happens at church.”

EXAMPLE

Complete scripts for weekly or monthly Family Experience are included as part of a 252 Basics license purchase. These scripts are provided as Word documents for easy customization by your church.

  • The goal of Family Experience is for it to be a consistent environment where parents learn what’s being taught at church so they can connect it with what’s happening at home. One way to launch a Family Experience environment is to plan a few during strategic times that leverage traditional events on a church’s calendar.
  • Plan to kick off a new ministry season with a weekend of events including a Friday or Saturday night where you introduce your first Family Experience and include a brief explanation of its purpose. Then, that Sunday, welcome kids back to the new season of their Groups Experience with a big party-like atmosphere!
  • Plan the next Family Experience for December when most churches plan and invest resources in a family Christmas service. Direct resources and time toward building momentum for a Family Experience!
  • Then, plan a final event at the close of the school-year ministry season.
  • After having presented three Family Experiences, you’ll have gained confidence and experience; you’ll have introduced the environment to parents and the congregation, and can then plan how the events will fit consistently into the following year’s schedule.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://www.whatisorange.org/252basics

Joy Bowen    Http://www.impulsivejoy.com/2010/05/six-essentials

Six Essentials to think about when getting ready to launch your Family Experience.

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STUDENTS & COLLEGE

Curriculum

New to Orange

Partnering with Parents

Portable Church

Small Groups

Service

 

Curriculum

Many youth pastors have a love/hate relationship with student ministry curriculum. For those who hate it, they often feel that there is no way any curriculum can fit the needs of their students and the style of their ministry. Believe it or not, we feel the same way. You get up in the morning to make a difference in a generation. That’s why we get up too. We’re not trying to get you to be something you’re not. We want to provide you with tools so you can be more of who you already are.

EXAMPLE
  • XP3 Students is designed to give you the necessary tools to have more time to be who you already are. We want to help you do what you do better. We provide the resources; you make them personal. You contextualize them to help you reach your students in your community.
  • XP3 Students isn’t just a curriculum with a strategy. XP3 Students is a strategic way to use a curriculum.
  • We’ve discovered that with a strategy . . .
  • Students move from information to experience.
  • Students don’t just go to church; they become the church.
  • Students don’t just believe in Jesus; they follow Him.
  • XP3 Students wants to help students experience the wonder of God. We want to help students discover who they are, who God made them to be. And we want to help students have a passion for God and people that spills out in their everyday relationships and in how they see the world.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://whatisorange.org/xp3students/ http://www.michaelbayne.net/2010/08/teachwith-plan.html

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New to Orange

XP3 Students is a curriculum for middle school/high school students that enables student ministries to implement the Orange Strategy—a strategy built on the principles that two influences (the church and the home) can have a greater impact when they work together. There are five principles of the Orange Strategy: Integrate Strategy, Refine the Message, Elevate Community, Reactivate the Family and Leverage Influence.

EXAMPLE
  • The XP3 Students curriculum includes a variety of components designed to incorporate each of these principles. For example, the Integrate Strategy principle means that XP3 Students has an end goal in mind, and that is to help students experience wonder, discovery and/or passion with every topical series.
  • Refine the Message is implemented by moving students past information and into experience through the XP component. This component provides opportunities for students to participate in an individual, small group or large group activity, reinforcing the main idea of that series.
  • Elevate Community is promoted within the Small Group Dialog and our belief that the small group leader is a vital element in the spiritual growth of students.
  • Reactivate the Family is advocated in the Parent Cue, a component designed to keep parents up to date with your current series. The Parent Cue provides them with “cues” to engage in conversation with their student about the content, as well as encourage parents to continue to fight for relationship with their child.
  • Leverage Influence is reflected in the consistent message of encouraging your students to become involved in serving, whether that’s in the local church, your community or helping others halfway around the world. XP3 Students believes that if you want students to feel significant, then give them something significant to do.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://whatisorange.org/

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Partnering with Parents

Partnering with parents is about creating a strategy recognizing that what goes on at home is the greatest influence in the life of a student. The church has a key role in working with parents and students to navigate this relationship. Over the course of a year, student ministries get 40-80 hours (on average) with any student, while their parents have the opportunity to spend up to 3,000 hours with their kids. Successful ministries recognize the potential in these parents, and look to design their ministry in a way that aligns what they are doing in the church with what happens at home. As teenagers grow up, moms and dads move from directors to influencers, and the church can be an incredible tool in helping them navigate this transition. In the student years, it is key to develop influential small group leaders who say the same things a good parent would say.

EXAMPLE
  • Strategy gets the attention of a parent more than information. Make sure you’re communicating your partnership strategy effectively.
  • When parents buy in, students are more likely to tune in.
  • The small group leader is most important during the student years as another adult influence in the life of a student.
  • Create opportunities for parents to build relationships with their child’s small group leader.
  • Most parents want to spend quality time with their kids, they just don’t know how—especially in the teenage years.
  • Create opportunities and ideas for parents and students to engage around what God is doing.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

http://www.whatisorange.org http://www.orangeparents.org

Steve Cullum    New Hampshire

We started a monthly “parent group.” It runs on the first youth group of the month, when we start our new XP3 series. The parents sit in as the student band plays, and we do a large group teaching. Then, when the students go off to their small groups, the parents have their own group. They cover the same topic/Scripture their children are discussing. However, they also talk about how they can continue the discussions at home. This group also serves as a way for parents to interact with each other and grow from one another’s experiences. We have found this to be a great time for students and parents to worship together, and to give parents their own small group time.

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Portable Church

Church plants and multisite churches often chose to meet in spaces that involve portable equipment. This provides unique opportunities in how ministries create irresistible environments for their students both in what they create and where they meet. Also, it involves the logistics of setting up and tearing down quickly.

EXAMPLE
  • Think of spaces that help you to reach students best and meet there.
  • Use carpets to define spaces and create pop. They add a lot and pack up quickly.
  • Use lighting to help create drama and define space. It looks great and it goes up and down quickly.
  • If you have to deal with a large space, use nice looking folding tables and chairs to fill the room, lights to darken unused areas, and pipe and drape to make it smaller. A crowded room feels more exciting.
  • If you can put it on wheels, go for it.
  • Cast vision for why having a dynamic space is important for students, this will allow you to recruit teams to help you set up and tear down.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

Portable Church Industries: http://www.portablechurch.com

Portable Church Case Study in an Orange Church: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLFZIkyxBPM&feature=related

Good Stuff Cheap: http://www.ikea.com http://www.alectrosystems.com

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Small Groups

Small groups are critical in leading students into a growing relationship with Jesus. Having adult leaders invest in middle and high school students is one of the best ways to ensure a godly influence is present in their lives through the teenage years. Imagine if every student, regardless of their relationship with mom and dad, had a mature follower of Jesus speaking truth into their lives.

EXAMPLE

The following are some ideas that will help the relationships that are formed in the context of student small groups:

  • Give leaders opportunities to meet the parents of students. The more connected mom and dad are to a small group leader, the more consistent a student’s group attendance will likely be. This could be Sunday mornings at church, cookouts, individual meetings, or special events designed specifically for getting parents and leaders connected.
  • Train leaders to find opportunities to spend time on their student’s turf. Many students realize a leader’s dedication to them when they spend time together outside of church. Teenagers often equate leading a small group at church as a “job” for adult leaders and see time spent outside of church as much more meaningful.
  • Give leaders a heads up on the topic of discussion within small groups. Students can spot an unprepared leader from a mile away. Help leaders understand the importance of heading into small group discussions with a plan.
  • Remember names! Nothing says you are meaningful like a leader remembering a student’s name the second time they see each other.
  • You cannot lead someone to a place you are not going or have never been. That’s why it is SO important for small group leaders in student ministry to put their relationship with Jesus first in their own lives and lead their groups to do the same.
ADDITIONAL LINKS

“5 essentials of a small group leader” http://www.xtremestudents.org/northpoint/five_essentials

“Help! I’m a Small Group Leader” Book: http://www.youthspecialties.com/shop/product_info.php?products_id=31

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Service

Students want to make a difference now. They won’t feel significant until they are given something significant to do. There is a direct link between spiritual growth and how a teen serves. The church should be a place where teenagers can find significant opportunities for making a difference and serving others. Teens can do things like lead worship, plan mission trips, create incredible media, or lead a small group.

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Good Stuff from Michael Bayne on Students Serving: http://www.michaelbayne.net/2010/07/next-level-missions-experience-for.html http://www.michaelbayne.net/2010/02/what-are-you-doing-to-empower-teens-to.html

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